Dr. Ian Grant-Whyte, Dyslexia Doc

This is a very entertaining and informative personal narrative of Dr. Ian Grant-Whyte and his experiences as a physician with dyslexia. Dr. Grant-Whyte graduated from Cambridge Medical School unable to read, and finally learned to read at 41. He cites attending a speed reading course as the key, having been introduced to the concept of using his finger as a pacer. Born in South Africa, he ends the interview with a Zulu lullabye. More information about Dr. Ian Grant-Whyte and his memoir can be found on his website at: http://www.dyslexicdoc.com/.

(Disclaimer: there are two words bleeped at the beginning of the interview. Potentially NSFW or around children.)

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The Society of Healthcare Professionals with Disabilities

Biomedical professionals with special needs should be considered when developing a strategy for an inclusive library. They are both patient and clinician. In addition to reference inquires that might arise when treating their patients, they may also have information and accessibility needs directly related to their own disabilities.

The Society of Healthcare Professionals with Disabilities (http://www.DisabilitySociety.org/) is an organization for health professionals with disabilities and associates. Providing professional resources and support, lifetime memberships are free. In addition to the global society, there are three subgroups:

  1. Physicians with Disabilities (www.PhysicianswithDisabilities.org)
  2. Pharmacists with Disabilities (http://www.PharmacistswithDisabilities.org)
  3. Nurses with Disabilities (http://NursingwithDisabilities.org)
The Society of Healthcare Professionals with Disabilities also maintains a blog that can be subscribed to via email or RSS.

U.S. GAO – Older Workers: Demographic Trends Pose Challenges for Employers and Workers

Though this report is now ten years old, it is interesting to revisit as this year marks the first that the Baby Boomer generation turned 65. It was estimated that by 2015, 19.6% of the labor force will be over the age of 55 (Figure 1).  These numbers are comparable to job statistics in the health sciences, 19.3 % of doctors and 12% of nurses were over the age of 55 in 2,000 (Table 8). These figures are important when considering the clientele of the biomedical library and the special needs that might arise with regards to potential vision, hearing, and mobility impairments as workers retire at a later age.

You can download a PDF of the report at: U.S. GAO – Older Workers: Demographic Trends Pose Challenges for Employers and Workers.